The Crusaders


In 2016, three militia members (Gavin Wright, Patrick Stein, and Curtis Allen) were arrested for plotting to commit an act of domestic terrorism. The defendants formed a right-wing anti-government and anti-immigrant called “The Crusaders.” Together, they planned to attack a nearby Muslim community on the day after the 2016 US presidential election. Their goals were to inspire other like-minded individuals to perform similar attacks around the country. They were stopped by a Federal informant in their midst.

Overview

Gavin Wayne Wright, Patrick Eugene Stein, and Curtis Wayne Allen were tried and convicted on civil rights and terrorism charges for plotting to attack a Somali community and mosque in in Garden City, KS.1 Investigated over a course of eight months, the trio often shared anti-immigrant rhetoric spread by then-candidate Trump. The trio was ultimately taken down by an FBI informant who became concerned about the very real chance of a violent attack after the Pulse nightclub shooting.2

During his testimony, the informant was on the verge of tears, and described needing to pull a gun to prevent a random attack from one of the defendants.3 Not everyone in the militia’s orbit shared their violent intentions; in at least one recorded discussion, one of their peers argued against instigating violence.

After a trial, the militamen were found guilty of several charges, most notably 18 U.S.C. § 241 Conspiracy Against Rights. The possible sentence includes life in prison

Case Summary

US v Allen et al (US District Court (Kansas) — 6:16-cr-10141-EFM)
Awaiting Sentencing
25-January-2019 (Sentencing)
These three milita-affiliated defendants were convicted in a jury trial for plotting to blow up a mosque in Kansas in 2016.
Curtis Wayne Allen
a.k.a.
Curtis Allen
Affiliations:
The Crusaders
Conspiracy to Use a Weapon of Mass Destruction
18 U.S.C. § 2 and 2332(a)(2) (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Up to 10 years
Conspiracy against Rights
18 U.S.C. § 241 (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Potentially Life
Unlawful Possession of Firearm
18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(9) and 924(a)(2) (United States Code)
Dismissed Up to 10 years
Patrick Eugene Stein
a.k.a.
Patrick Stein
Affiliations:
The Crusaders
Conspiracy to Use a Weapon of Mass Destruction
18 U.S.C. § 2 and 2332(a)(2) (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Up to 10 years
Conspiracy against Rights
18 U.S.C. § 241 (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Potentially Life
Using a Firearm During a Crime of Violence (2 counts)
18 U.S.C. § 924(c)(1)(a) (United States Code)
Dismissed Up to 10 years
Gavin Wayne Wright
a.k.a.
Gavin Wright
Affiliations:
The Crusaders
Conspiracy to Use a Weapon of Mass Destruction
18 U.S.C. § 2 and 2332(a)(2) (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Up to 10 years
Conspiracy against Rights
18 U.S.C. § 241 (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Potentially Life
Making False Statements
18 U.S.C. § 1001 (United States Code)
Convicted (jury) Up to 5 years

Document List

A note about the manifesto…

During the investigation, federal investigators recovered a handwritten manifesto that they worked on together. This manifesto, while deeply racist, is similar in tone and content to materials found on right-wing Facebook sites or the comments on some news stories. The militia was ultimately unsuccessful in distributing the manifesto, and it has never been circulated.

Publishing the manifesto alongside other the other public evidence in this case is a controversial matter. Publishing the manifesto could, in effect, provide a platform for their messages of violence and bigotry and inspire copycat attackers. However, publishing it could also provide imporant evidence in arguments against the tone and rhetoric of other similar-minded individuals. The manifesto was valuable at trial, and it will be valuable for other research or writings. However, just because something is valuable does not mean it is not also dangerous. Consequently, the manifesto is not hosted on First Vigil. This decision will be revisited from time to time, when a balance of the document’s value can be weighed against its danger in contemporary contexts. In the meantime, the manifesto will be made available to legitimate researchers after a vetting process.

References


All people on this list are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Arrests, charges, and indictments are not considered evidence of wrongdoing. All defendants presented herein have a right to due process. The public also has a right to learning the disposition of their cases.